Odds are good you’re using at least one cloud service to store most of your important data, but it can be tough to stay under most services’ free limits if you have a ton of stuff.

Google just announced big changes to its paid storage plans for Google Drive, rebranding them “Google One,” and making a few of them cheaper and bigger. But do these changes give you a better deal than the other major storage services you can use? Let’s explore.

Google One: Way better than older Google Drive storage plans

As Google upgrades all current Drive users to Google One, its older storage plans will go away at some point over the next few months. (And, no, Google isn’t rebranding the entire “Google Drive” service to “One.” There’s Google Drive, the storage and backup service, and the supplemental “Google One” subscriptions you’ll soon be able to purchase for it.)

Here are the different amounts of storage you can get for Google Drive today:

  • 15GB: Free. Go crazy.
  • 100GB: $2/mo
  • 1TB: $10/mo
  • 2TB: $20/mo
  • 10TB: $100/mo
  • 20TB: $200/mo
  • 30TB: $300/mo

And when Google One debuts later this year—sign up for updates here—here’s how the pricing plans will change:

  • 15GB: Still free. Keep going crazy.
  • 100GB: $2/mo
  • 200GB: $3/mo (new!)
  • 1TB: $10/mo (gone!)
  • 2TB: $20/mo $10/mo
  • 10TB: $100/mo
  • 20TB: $200/mo
  • 30TB: $300/mo
Screenshot: David Murphy

Google One versus everyone else

Google’s tweaks drop the price of its 2TB plan to the former price of its 1TB plan—effectively doubling your storage for free, especially since the 1TB plan is now gone. Google’s new $3-for-200GB plan is actually a slightly better deal, on a dollar-per-gigabyte basis, than its $2-for-100GB plan, but its $10-for-2TB plan now has the best price-to-storage ratio of all.

Now let’s take a look at how Google One stacks up against the competition. I’ll focus on the storage tiers you’re most likely to buy (and the tiers services have in common, or close to it), as I doubt most people are plunking down a hundo each month for ten terabytes. Here’s what you can get on Amazon, Apple, Box, Dropbox, Google, Mega, and OneDrive:

Free
😐Amazon: 5GB
😐Apple: 5GB
🔥Box: 10GB (250MB limit on all individual files)
❌Dropbox: 2GB
🔥Google: 15GB
🤔Mega: 50GB (1GB transfer limit for every six hours)
😐OneDrive: 5GB
Winner: Google (transfer limits are annoying)

Best plan <$5 monthly
😐Amazon: 100GB for $1/mo
🔥Apple: 200GB for $3/mo
❌Box: DNE
❌Dropbox: DNE
🔥Google: 200GB ($3/mo)
❌Mega: DNE (200GB for 5€/mo, so your final price in USD, as of when we wrote this, is just around $6/mo)
❌OneDrive: 50GB ($2/mo)
Winner: Apple or Google (tie)

Best plan <$10 monthly
🔥Amazon: 2TB for $10/mo
🔥Apple: 2TB for $10/mo
❌Box: 100GB for $10/mo
❌Dropbox: 1TB for $10/mo
🔥Google: 2TB for $10/mo
❌Mega: 200GB for 5€/mo (around $6/mo)
😐OneDrive: 1TB for $7/mo
Winner: Amazon, Apple, or Google (tie)

Best plan <$20 monthly
🔥Amazon: 4TB for $20/mo
🔥Apple: 2TB for $10/mo
❌Box: 100GB for $10/mo
❌Dropbox: 1TB for $10/mo
🔥Google: 2TB for $10/mo
❌Mega: 1TB 10€/mo (around $12/mo, and a 4TB plan is around $22/mo)
😐OneDrive: 1TB for $7/mo
Winner: Amazon (with Apple and Google a close second)

Google sweetens the deal

Even though Google One is pretty competitive, storage-wise, against everybody else, ponying up for a Google One plan will net you a few extra features that might tip the scales in Google’s favor. For starters, you’ll get access to live experts—real people, not Google’s clever AIs—who can help you with any of Google’s services via chat, email, or a phone call. You’ll also be able to share your storage plan with up to five other family members, in case you all want to contribute to one of Google’s larger offerings and divide the storage pool among yourselves.

Screenshot: David Murphy

Google One subscribers will also receive other benefits at some future point, which could possibly include discounts on other Google services—including hotels you find via a Google search.